Mrbrendan Blog

Apr21

France-Italy 2019

We had the chance to travel with some friends Thomas and Leslie and check out parts of France with some friends. We also got the chance to show some of our favorite parts of Italy. Firstly, we ended up in France, just south of Paris and met the wonderful family that used to stay with Thomas and Leslie at the Cape. We were lucky enough to tag along for this part. Their hospitality was that fit for a king. Paris We got to see this just two weeks before it burnt. So sad for such a national treasure to be damaged like that. But France will recover. They always do. Country dining in the French countryside. Unreal experience. Only locals here, no tourists. Well, except for us. Lesson learned. In France, you don’t tell people you are coming. Otherwise, they will put out a spread fit for royalty. No joke. Meanwhile… back in Italy. I present you… Verona. Lake Garda Stumbled across the church of St. Anthony’s. Surprised how many people were here and how under-advertised this place is. Venice Modena Spy Ferrari shots… Traversetolo Parma Florence Pisa Lucca Riding bikes along the ring medieval walls in Lucca. Siena Manarola...

Jan03

Iran 2018

Iran, where does one start – the Facebook status proclamation said it best; “It’s complicated“. And so is deciding where to start this blog post… Iran has a long and complicated history – a history that includes invasion, oppression, glory, opulence and revolution. And not necessarily in that order. If the first thing that comes to your mind is Axis of Evil or “Allahua Akbar” and ISIS, you are in for a big surprise! Edit – 1/4/2020 – I can no longer advise American’s to visit Iran. At least not while Trump is president. It would be irresponsible of me to state otherwise. Now with the killing of General Soleimani, all bets are off the table. If you still decide to travel to Iran you run the real risk of being used as a political pawn. You’ve been warned, for the time being! Why Iran? A fair question – particularly for Americans. Firstly, I’ve wanted to go to Iran for over 10 years for photography reasons. As you will see in the proceeding photographs, it is an absolutely beautiful country with world class attractions (23 UNESCO World Heritage sites!). Secondarily, Persians (As Iranians prefer to be referred to as), are legendary for their hospitality and accommodating nature, particularly for guests/tourists. This proved true everywhere we went…. People were extremely friendly – from people asking about Trump to just wanting to practice English, it was a real delight having people wanting to converse with us and getting to know their way of life. Lastly, western media or more specifically American media has portrayed Iran in a very negative light for over 40 years. Some of that was earned and some of it due to external influence. (More on that later). but if you do a little bit of independent research, you’ll see that Europeans, Australians, Chinese, Russian and more folks have been touring Iran for decades. It’s like we didn’t get the memo that it was worthy to travel to… while the rest of the world is enjoying all it has to offer. Wasn’t it scary? Not one bit. As i mentioned above, people from other countries have been going there for years. It’s a popular destination for seemingly everyone but Americans. No police, no military on the streets, apparently little to no crime (Even in Tehran, their biggest city)… so what gives? Why are Americans so afraid of this place? I think it can be summed up in two words: Islam and Terrorism. Foreigners are treated very kindly in Iran and even more-so when they hear you are from America. I already knew this from watching Rick Steve’s Iran episode on PBS. But wait, haven’t people been detained in Iran and sometimes even imprisoned? Yes – there have been cases of this. If your family history originally descends from Iran, even if you are an American citizens – sometimes the Iranian government likes to harass and/or detain folks of this background. There have been isolated cases of tourists without Iranian descent also being detained, but usually for reasons like taking photographs of embassies or military installations etc. If you are not of Iranian descent and don’t take pictures or write journalism of sensitive subjects, it seems you are pretty safe in Iran. Some Background I’ve written a long and detailed page about my views and why i care about Iran which you can view by clicking this link. The short version is that yes, Iran’s government is a bit… stubborn, blowhards, prideful and support terrorism in some form. And ultimately, the regime needs an enemy to justify their existence in order to claim to be protecting the people from foreign adversaries. I don’t want to get too political on this page as to detract from the photographs i took there, so that’s why i created this second page to discuss these subjects without cluttering my main message through photography. For...

Apr27

Switzerland 2017

Back to Switzerland. This time we brought Renu’s Mom and Dad to experience it. We brought them to Dubai a few years back – but that was fairly familiar to them. Europe would be a whole new experience. To begin with, they left Delhi which just the prior was 102′. We went to Luzern first which was 47′ . So a big difference indeed. This along with the fact that they don’t do a large amount of walking and it was going to be a stretch for them. But to my surprise, they did very well. Both – with the weather and the large amount of walking involved. To make amends – we ate at a lot of Indian restaurants to lessen the blow for them. =) We started in Luzern and ended in Bern. It was a great trip. Enjoy the photographs:     Enjoying the view from the train.   The Gondola ride up to Mt. Titlis.   This was pretty cool, it was a Glacier cave, Renu’s mom and dad didn’t enjoy it too much. =)   The views from Mt. Titlis.   This was a funny moment… Renu’s mom had to touch the snow to ensure it was really snow. Her first time being around it – she thought maybe it was like a manmade powder or something. haha   Paragliders and Skydivers everywhere.   The beautiful town of Luzern.   We came across this park by chance. This is in the town of Cham. Never heard of it, but so glad we went there…   Lausanne We have the good fortune of having friends in Lausanne, so they graciously booked lunch for us at the Olympic Museum. It was a very nice place and a cool experience. We also got to meet their daughter Alice for the...

Nov14

2016 Peru

This was our first time in South America and i have to say, it was a blast! Viva Peru! For this trip, we wanted a little more outdoorsy type stuff and Renu was crazed about the prospects of being able to visit the Amazon Jungle. I was excited about climbing a mountain and sleeping on some mountainside pods, so we decided what better place than Peru to see it through… I’m not entirely sure why, maybe i just figured it was relatively easy to visit due to its proximity to North America, but I’ve been putting off South America for years. And boy do i regret it. I got to bust out my 7th grade Spanish (Thanks, Mrs. Asenho, i retained a decent amount and you were a great teacher!), and people in Peru were extremely nice. This marks the first time ever that we used a tour company at the suggestion of my colleague Jason O’Brien, and while the tour was amazing, and we had great guides, Renu and i decided that tours are just not for us. We found this out the last day in Lima when we were on a bus getting ready for our Lima city tour, something just didn’t feel right, so we got off the bus. We ran into some folks on bicycles, asked where they rented them from, we got there, rented two and off we were. From that moment on, we really felt free. I guess we don’t like the idea that you are seeing what the tour company wants you to see vs. what is actually out there. That’s probably our biggest complaint. Don’t get us wrong, we could have changed the itinerary and it wasn’t the tour companies fault, obviously, but more about how we like to travel. We like to plan less and see where things take us. So no more tours for us. Anyhow, we visited three major areas, Puerto Maldonado, Cusco, and Lima. New York City, seen from Newark: Puerto Maldonado Here we stayed at the absolutely amazing Amazonas Refugio lodge. Puerto Maldonado is already on the cusp of the forest, but then to get to this lodge – you take a boat ride for 2.5 hours!!! to the lodge. And once you reach the shore of the lodge it’s about another 15-20 minutes into the forest. So make no mistake, you are in the motherfuckin’ forest by the time you get there. This isn’t one of those forest ‘feeling’ type places. Oh no. You are in the thick of it. And that’s by design. The owner wanted you engulfed in nature with no noise, no distractions other than nature itself. A 100% success. Amazingly, they even had (weak) wifi. Anyhow, while here, we were completely captivated with the facilities and wildlife. The facilities consist of a huge main lodge, which serves as a lounge, bar, cafeteria and library, houses a lot of people at once. And there are three large wings which house the bungalows. In each room, you have three walls only. The fourth wall is completely open (Without screen) to the forest. We saw and heard birds, small animals and huge butterfly’s. You sleep with mosquito nets over your bed which was different and the sound of insects at night was almost deafening. We also got a taste of Red Howler monkey’s in the middle of the forest (Sounds like some crazy machine!): [embedyt] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zfG5UU-1s8c[/embedyt] But overall an amazing experience. Something very special and unique. I would highly recommend this to couples and small families alike. Each day is filled with activities, from kayaking/canoeing, nighttime Cayman hunting, all sorts of stuff. Anyhow, enjoy the pics: A video of the macau’s here: [embedyt] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uo4_jV7CKNk[/embedyt] Cusco Cusco seemed the quintessential South American city. Beautiful old architecture, lots of pride and tradition and lastly many sites and shopping! It has an extremely high elevation 12,000 feet...

Jul31

Quincy Datacenter and Undersea Fiber Optic Cable Landing Station...

Quincy Tech Datacenter and Undersea Fiber Cable Landing Station Summary Background: While doing some research I came across an idea that I believe would greatly benefit the city of Quincy. There are two parts to this idea and the reason behind that is it’s sort of a symbiotic scenario where it’s unlikely for one to exist without the other. This idea came to me after watching several thousand IT workers on the Red Line heading to downtown Boston for work one day…   The Idea: To advocate undersea fiber cable providers to use the coast near the Fore River Shipyard as a international fiber optic cable landing station. Which will in turn attract a Datacenter of one of the big content providers in the country to build their Datacenter on the Fore River shipyard property.    Definitions: 1. Undersea Fiber Optics Cable – A literal cable about 4” in diameter which companies use to provide internet connections between continents.  2. Landing Station – A small building which receives the cable between continents and converts the light pulses in the cable to internet connections via severs in the building.  3. Datacenter – A large building or series of buildings that house servers which feed the internet’s respective ‘content’.    Why Quincy? Unique Geography & Popular Demand: 1. Fore River Shipyard – Enough Land to house the largest of Datacenters, rarely is that much land available near a major tech hub and having direct access to ocean cabling routes.  2. Fiber Cable Safety – The Fore River lane is dredged for Panamax sized ships. The cable can be buried safely and even routed from the coastline directly.  3. Major Hub Proximity – 9 miles to Boston, one of our country’s largest tech hubs. But equally important...

Apr23

2016 Netherlands

Red Light District, marijuana brownies, wooden clogs, Gouda cheese – just one of the many things that come to mind when one mentions the Netherlands… As any American is aware – most Europeans in general are fairly liberal when it comes to things like sex and other subjects that may be fairly taboo here in the states. But what i noticed between my last visit and this one is that the Red Light District is shrinking and while i did smell as much Marijuana as i had on my previous trip around the streets – there also appeared to be less pot shops compared to last time. So i wonder if these industries are starting to wear themselves out. That could make for an interesting social study… Now with the controversial and popular subjects out of the way… I’d like to speak about the real Netherlands, not just Amsterdam. On this trip with our friends Heather and Paul, we visited Enkhuizen, Alkmaar, Medemblick, Hoorn, Haarlem, Hague, Delft, Rotterdam, Leiden, Lisse, Gouda, Schiedam, , Utrecht, Maastricht, Valkenburg and yes, Amsterdam. Our goal was to see wide swaths of the country, beyond the tourist traps and get into the little towns and witness everyday life.   Enkhuizen Enkhuizen is a nice little seaside town in the Northern Netherlands. It has a nice shopping area, good little cafes and excellent restaurants. This town is pretty cool in that you can really disappear from the hustle and bustle here. It seemed like there was a small contingent of German Tourists here, but otherwise – appeared to be mostly locals. We stayed at a really nice hotel, Hotel De Koepoort. Which translates to “The Cow Port”. Amazing little hotel in Enkhuizen, it could hold its own against any 5...

May15

2015 Northern Italy

Renu wanted an authentic Italian experience so we decided to stay in Northern Italy this year. We felt that going to Rome etc wouldn’t result in an authentic experience, so we decided to stay in much smaller towns. We haven’t had much luck in big cities and real life experiences and that continued in Italy despite our best efforts to avoid it. (Florence). Everyone experiences Italy differently and we just decided we wanted a low-key small town kind of vacation.   Milan Milan was supposed to be our springboard city. We’d simply land there, sleep one night, and move on to our actual destination cities. Milan is a beautiful city was an amazing duomo and interesting city center, but I’ve never felt compelled to spend time there. Though this interesting artwork helped:   After the first few hours Renu agreed. However we found out the Milan Expo was going on, we decided to take a look around. We noticed this large stage erected in front of the duomo, but figured we’d find out what was going on later. After all, we simply landed there just 4 hours prior. So we walked around a bit and then decided we were tired and headed back to the hotel around 7pm. Subsequently, we fell asleep shortly thereafter. Since the Expo started on May 1st and it was just April 30th, we figured we had nothing to miss. Oh right, except Andrea Bocelli was performing Nessun Dorma live on that stage that night for the inaugural concert of the expo. I turn on the Italian news around 3am (We are still on US time) and i see his performance, and notice the stage he was on looked familiar… So we decided to go to back to the hotel to sleep, meanwhile 1/2 mile away Andrea Bocelli is performing Nessun Dorma live in front of the Milano Duomo. I was so angry. I’ll never forgive myself for missing that concert. And how could the hotel staff let us go back to our rooms?!?! 🙂 Anyhow, life goes on. The scene of the crime:   The most ornate door I’ve ever seen:   Renu looking pretty:   This was most unusual. Note, it was on the other side of the middle finger statue:   Pavia, the actual Pavia. Downtown Bostonian’s can enjoy this one:   Renu’s default action on a morning train:   Renu checking email while on vacation, another default action. 🙂   Cinque Terre Cinque Terre is a beautiful area with 5 distinct inlets all within walking distance of each other. Rick Steves really sells this place and it was fantastic. There was a decent amount of tourists here, but it died off in the evening. This was really the highlight of our stay. We took a boat tour to see each from the sea and it was spectacular.   Vernazza   Manarola   The view from our hotel room:   Prep for our Pesto Class with Nessun Dorma.   Kind of a precarious way to exit a boat in rough seas:   Corniglia   Corniglia   Monte Rosso   Corniglia Again   Rio Maggiore   Some tourist folks along on the boat ride with us around Cinque Terre:   Florence Florence is a beautiful city with many sites, but we simply found it too crowded and only found touristy type shops here. Amazing Duomo which you see pictured here, but we decided to skip most remaining large cities.   over 100mph:   Venice …Of all places. Renu wanted to see it, so we drove there. Beautiful canals and houses, but again very very touristy. We were there the first week of May, i can’t imagine what it’d be like if we were there mid-June or mid-July.   My favorite photograph:   Mantova We took a day trip to Mantua (Mantova) to the St. Andrea Basilica. A really beautiful place:   Modena &...

Quincy Center Promenade...

Introduction Quincy, Massachusetts. A long time blue-collar city just outside of Boston which was long known for its shipbuilders, Granite and in the very old days.. an airport and flight firsts. (Yes, Quincy used to have an airfield.) Today, Quincy Center and Quincy as a whole is on the fringe of undergoing very large – some may even say controversial changes to its traffic patterns and infrastructure for future use. That is the subject of this article today. I recently read a book called ‘Walkable City‘ by Jeff Speck, a Massachusetts native. In this book and several other books like it, he waxes poetic about multi-modal transportation and the modern renaissance movement consisting of cities taking back their public spaces and making them more accessible to pedestrians and to other modes of transportation other than cars. And in other books, there seems to be a common theme among those who have spent the better part of their lives studying transportation, public spaces and general livability standards around the world, that cities should take back their public spaces and make them great spaces that attract all kinds and can be used by the public for things other than traffic. Quincy, like many cities in the late 1800s to the early 1900s experienced a modest lifestyle and social scene led by its working class. Word War I to World War II brought with it modest prosperity with heavy industry, namely shipbuilding and other military-based factories. Before WWI, main transportation methods were horse-drawn carriage and good ol’ fashioned walking. Just before WWII trolleys became the main public transport method through Quincy’s main thoroughfares along with the introduction of the automobile. Between the 1950s to 1960s the automobile became affordable to the average American and a status symbol...

Nov27

2014 India/Nepal Trip

Renu and I travel to India regularly now, once every 1-2 years or so. This year we decided to do a family trip within India and headed to Kerala. Kerala is a beautiful, lush green state in the southern-most tip of India. Just like Boston to Miami, there is a huge shift in temperature. So in November, Delhi can hit the 50’s meanwhile Kerala can be in the 80’s+. Kerala is self-titled “Gods own Country”. And it is undoubtedly one of the most beautiful places on earth. But damn, can it be hot. I always summarize it as the place where you can take a shower and be completely covered in sweat again immediately upon leaving the shower. Aside from that fun, this was my third time visiting Kerala and it never disappoints. We stayed at a lovely BnB named LillyPad. It was more like a private resort right on lake Vembanad, Kumarakom. When tourists first look at Kerala, they think ‘houseboat’. And that is a great experience once. For me, the highlight of Kerala is going down the backwaters in a very slow boat and seeing real Kerala life. It’s an interesting place in the sense that one can see into the backs of homes as you travel down the canals. And it’s just people eating dinner at home, washing clothes, kids playing. I fall in love with it every time because it’s not a tourist trap, or conveying an image of what India tourism wants me to see, it’s just real life. American’s in particular may be surprised to find out that India has two communist governments in two states. Kerala is one and West Bengal is another. So you see a lot of hammer and sickles about. And you will see some in my pictures as well. We also decided to travel to Nepal this year. Which was a new place for me, so naturally i was excited… However, the excitement didn’t last…. Right off the bat the electricity at the airport went out, upon our arrival. And they have the most antiquated customs/immigration process for foreigners I’ve ever seen. I say the following as someone that’s been all over India, including big cities and small villages… Nepal, Kathmandu in particular is insanity! It’s congested, but they follow traffic rules. There are huge amounts of cars and motorbikes, but absolutely zero auto-rickshaws. They are right next to India, yet almost no ladies wear Saris. A paradox in many ways it seems. But amazing nonetheless. It seemed to me that the only people heading to Nepal were trekkers and those seeking spiritual guidance. Must be the two biggest reasons to visit Nepal. And since we weren’t seeking spiritual guidance or hardcore trekking we fell into the middle zone. So we visited some spiritual sites. Some ‘stupas’ (Buddhist Temples) and we did some flying over mountains, particularly the Annapurna Range in Pokhara. We decided to do some ultralight flights over the Annapurna range with Avia Club Nepal. What a great decision that was… helicopter tours near Mt. Everest and Pokhara go for anywhere from $2000-5000USD. Insanity, we got an ultralight flight over Annapurna for $270. No brainer. And honestly, we flew over Zermatt in a helicopter, over the Matterhorn and as beautiful and amazing as that was, i think the ultralight is really a much difference experience than being in a helicopter. And i’m saying that as someone who adores helicopters! I find it hard to describe Nepal, sure they have Mt. Everest and a large swath of the Himilayas. But then you go to Kathmandu and the congestion and strip clubs throw you for a loop. I guess the reason i find it so hard to properly grasp Nepal is that it’s right next to India, yet it’s so much different than India. You go to Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, it’s it’s just like a different flavor...

Nov27

Thomas Menino

When i was growing up in South Boston, we had a great Mayor. Ray Flynn. I was a bit young to understand politics at that time, but he was well liked around many parts in South Boston. My first interaction with him was, as told by my mother – There was some dedication ceremony at Castle Island and i walked up on stage and sat next to the Mayor as they announced something which i can’t remember. I don’t even recall doing that. My next encounter was something that stayed with me, i was walking down Preble street one day and heard a commotion of fire engines, people screaming etc. Apparently there was a big fire on the very corner of Preble St and Dot Ave. And then i saw that Mayor Flynn was helping a young lady that appeared to be burned away from the raging fire. That never left me. Fast forward to Thomas Menino. The man who started a push for “Bike Week” was himself hit by a car. The man that every time he spoke publicly, you listened to hear the funny mistakes or the umpteenth mispronounced word. After school we used to head to Chinatown Cafe almost daily for lunch and occasionally we’d see the mayor come in. That was my first glimpse of Mr. Menino. Unimpressive but always dressed to the nines. He’d come in, talk to Mr. Soohoo the owner and joke around a bit and get his food and typically leave. You would see his name and sometimes his face on everything going on in the city. That which is expected from a local politician and a consummate politician he always was. Nobody could have the nickname ‘mumbles’ in public office and not be a bit...

Nov25

2014 Switzerland Trip...

Switzerland, people think chocolate, mountains and bankers. And they’d be right. However, during Christmas time, it has all of these things plus this great Christmas atmosphere. The German sector of Switzerland loosens up a bit and you see more people smiling, the French sector you see more people kissing and the Italian sector, well, they just keep doing what they do everyday because Italians live everyday like their last. Blanket generalizations, sure. This was Renu’s first time in Switzerland so we decided to hit up several cities and show her what there is to offer. We visited Zurich, Lucerne, Bern, Basel, Interlaken, Lausanne, Interlaken, Geneva, Zermatt and Monstein. Monstein? Yes, Monstein. Most of it was sightseeing, however we mixed in catching up with an old friend and some scientific exploration for good measure. Switzerland calls me once every 3-4 years and i suppose because it’s such a small country and yet it’s geographically diverse. The German’s in the North, the Italians in the South and the French to the West. It’s kind of like a Mall’s food court, lots of diverse cuisines compacted into a really small space. Add onto that the beautiful pristine landscapes, strong Swiss pedigree and true commitment to green energy and sustainability (Not like the US claims to be, but actually isn’t…) and it’s a really formidable country in terms of tourist draw. Maybe it’s analogous to buying concentrated orange juice, less physical size, but more dense with beauty and culture. Ok, enough with the horrible analogies. During the Christmas season, there is an awesome festive mood. Zurich’s old town serves Gluhwein and Punch, which was amazing, think of the Punch like an aromatic, hot apple cider but more tasty. All the major cities and many towns have a Christmas...

Welcome!

Why hello there. Thank you for visiting my new blog. I used to be very vocal on social media sites and i’ve decided that i wanted to own my content without giving up usage rights and content ownership contested and lastly communications tracked. But ultimately, i wanted to connect with people (If anyone actually reads this blog) on my own terms. True, i can’t control browser statistics of my users. But we all have to compromise somewhere… I’ll be adding content regularly and i’ll try my best to ensure they don’t turn into personal rants, but instead invoke new thoughts or give the ability for one to extract interesting information on subject that i also find interesting. I’ve tried to categorize the posts so that one can know whether i’m conveying truth or satire etc. Since those lines are so commonly blurred on the internet. Worst case scenario, this blog will at least serve as a placeholder and point of reference for when i end up in psychiatric care. Enjoy!...

Aug15

Renu + Brendan

After years of documenting other couples romances, learning their personal stories and most certainly what makes most couples ‘tick’… I figured it was time to tell my story. I’m usually fairly private when it comes to my personal life. However, several of our friends and family couldn’t make it to Delhi. So this will be a photographic and novel placeholder for those that couldn’t make it and I guess now – for the world to see. Renu and I met just under two years ago. We’ve had our very own version of a whirlwind romance and here I sit at Schiphol Airport spilling the proverbial ‘beans’… Renu and I didn’t hit it off immediately. Actually when I first met her, I thought she was standoffish and rather brute in her demeanor and was put off by this. Our first ‘date’ was a complete disaster. Coincidentally enough, as I sit here at Schiphol Airport – I brought Stroopwaffels to our first date. Thinking back, I have no idea why I brought those to our first date. Moving on… her standoffish demeanor was off-putting at first but then I realized that people with this demeanor oftentimes are equally as passionate about things they hate and love. I personally believe that people like this have huge caring hearts, and they put on this shell-like facade because of past experiences. I guess for Renu and myself, it was fate that I saw right through her. As the relationship progressed I learned that she also had the innate ability to see through me as well. I guess this works well, as we both have the ‘feature’ where we basically talk before we think, particularly when in an aggravated state of mind. However, one of the things I love most...

Delhi Bridal Fashion Shoot...

Foreword: I used to have a photography business: symbolphoto.com or view: https://www.flickr.com/photos/symbolphotography/ Every once in a while you have to throw your expectations and preconceived notions right out the window… After returning from Jaipur we were contacted about setting up a shoot in Delhi. After making some calls, we had a model, an amazing dress manufacturer and a location set. Everyone who has experience in all things India knows that you need a plan B and oftentimes even a plan C. So I made sure to have plan D to ensure things went off without a hitch. We blew through plan A and B in the first 15 minutes. Plan C involved a little bribery with the police and long periods of waiting, but we finally got through the shoot. Tarun Tahiliani gave us two of his latest dresses for us to incorporate into our shoot and we were let loose around Delhi to use them as we saw fit. Each dress was extremely heavy when held only in your hands, though once on the model, she confirmed that it was bearable since the weight was distributed throughout the body. Shooting on the street in India isn’t as hard as it may seem at first, we have experience dealing with all sorts of incidentals. But shooting in the middle of Delhi on a busy weekday can test the patience of any seasoned photographer. Luckily, we over-prepared. After the shoot, we returned to the Tarun Tahiliani factory and that’s where our expectations were blown away. Tarun Tahiliani’s factory is in a very unassuming location outside Delhi. The preconceived notions i had were that we’d enter some musty factory filled with underpaid and overworked employees. More wrong – i could not be. Not only was the...

India 2009

Boston Wedding Photographers usually don’t get a break until late November or Early December. I decided this year to again visit beautiful India. And I already miss it… They say India’s society is an exercise in “survival of the fittest” and the same could be said for its tourists. India is the type of place that can chew up and spit out the most seasoned of world travelers… and ask for seconds. The minute you get into a car in India you will see the idol ‘Ganesh’ on the dashboard of even the most desperate auto-rickshaw. And there is a reason – you’re going to need that God at every corner, every intersection and maybe even just in your hotel’s parking lot. One wonders why you don’t see Ganesh on citizens shoelaces and on bicycles, because as Ganesh knows, they need it more. But despite all of this, once you let go of your preconceived notions and just let the chaos envelope you and go with the flow, then and only then are you are truly ready to be a tourist of this fine country. Colors, odors, animals all congregate here, and typically in the same place. All living things are abound and in full force. All it takes is the leveling of your camera to invoke a smile of even the most destitute of people. And that’s where the love comes in. How could one not fall in love with people who persevere and smile in the face of life’s most ardent adversary – daily life in a third world country. I hesitate to call India a ‘third world’ country, as it surely doesn’t feel like one to me. But alas, true to definition, it is. However, as third-world as it may be,...